Globalist BCLib government is expanding its current childhood immunization program to include rotavirus vaccine, a varicella (chickenpox) booster, and hepatitis A vaccine for Aboriginal children, both on- and off-reserve.

B.C. expands immunizations for children

November 14, 2011
VICTORIA – Immunization is one of the most effective ways to prevent serious disease. Starting Jan. 1, 2012, three new vaccines will be added to the British Columbia childhood immunization schedule, to ensure that children in B.C. get the most effective protection possible from preventable diseases.The Province is expanding its current childhood immunization program to include rotavirus vaccine, a varicella (chickenpox) booster, and hepatitis A vaccine for Aboriginal children, both on- and off-reserve. Total purchase costs for these vaccines will be approximately $3.1 million per year.

The rotavirus vaccine is administered orally, and protects infants from diarrhoea and vomiting caused by the rotavirus. All infants born on or after Nov. 1, 2011 will be eligible. The first dose is administered at two months of age, followed by a second dose at four months.

To help provide lifetime immunity against chickenpox, a varicella booster dose has also been added to the immunization schedule. This booster has been recommended by the Canadian Paediatric Society and the National Advisory Committee on Immunization as offering improved and longer lasting protection. Children get their first dose at 12 months. The second dose will now be offered to children at school entry (four to six years of age). Chickenpox is a viral infection that causes an itchy blistering rash, but can also cause infections in any part of the body, including the brain.

In addition, B.C. will now be offering hepatitis A vaccine to all Aboriginal infants and children. Although B.C.’s overall hepatitis A rates have declined over the past 15 years, outbreaks have continued to occur in Aboriginal communities. A targeted vaccination program for Aboriginal children will help prevent illness in this group. Hepatitis A affects the liver and can cause fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting and yellow skin and eyes. It is easily spread through activities such as sharing of food and changing of diapers.

The new additions to B.C.’s immunization schedule have been reviewed and recommended by the BC Communicable Disease Policy Advisory Committee and the BC Immunization Committee. With these additions, B.C. will continue to have one of the most comprehensive immunization programs in Canada.

To find out more about childhood immunizations, contact HealthLink BC at 8-1-1, or visit: www.ImmunizeBC.ca

Quotes:

Dr. Perry Kendall, provincial health officer –

“Each of these vaccines has been clinically proven to offer significant protection against potentially harmful diseases. By investing in their prevention now, we can prevent pain, suffering and costs down the road.”

Dr. Monika Naus, medical director, BC Centre for Disease Control –

“We recommended these three new vaccines because they will give children extra immunity and protection from infectious diseases. Parents can be assured that these vaccines are safe and effective and will prevent serious health problems in the future. Additionally, rotavirus vaccine is given by mouth and does not require an injection. That should be a welcome change to many.”

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2 Responses to Globalist BCLib government is expanding its current childhood immunization program to include rotavirus vaccine, a varicella (chickenpox) booster, and hepatitis A vaccine for Aboriginal children, both on- and off-reserve.

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