THE LIVES OF WILLIAM HARTNELL By SUSANNA BRYANT DAKIN: fascinating study of a many-faceted personality

Here is the biography of an Englishman who died a Californian in the year 1854 – a man who possessed faculties and influence seldom found in one individual, although he acquired neither wealth nor fame.

The people of Monterey respected William Hartnell, with his background of seven careers all over the world.

He founded the first school of higher education in California.

He married Teresa de la Guerra and his home became the epitome of California hospitality throughout the period of Mexican administration and in the early years of American conquest.

Still he frequently complained that he could barely afford to keep his family in “common decency.”

Hartnell participated in the intellectual, social, and political life of California during three decades.

He was an inveterate correspondent and thanks to his wife’s cousin, the famous General Mariano Vallejo, hundreds of Hartnell letters were preserved.

Vallejo remembered his old tutor as the most informed man of his acquaintance and collected the correspondence to use as source material for a history of California.

That history was never written, but the letters and journals are now in the Bancroft Library at the University of California.

Mainly from them, Mrs. Dakin has compiled The Lives of William Hartnell, a story which is a fascinating study of a many-faceted personality as well as the chronicle of an important era in California’s history.

STANFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS

STANFORD, CALIFORNIA

 

[Inside front dust jacket cover,

The Lives of William Hartnell,

published by Stanford University Press in 1949.]

 

CCC – LA ROSA TRANSCULTURAL PACIFICAN HISTORY 1849 – 2009

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SAINT AIDAN: ‘inspired with a passionate love of goodness, but at the same time a man of remarkable gentleness and moderaton’

AUGUST 31

651

Saint Aidan, Irish monk of Iona, first bishop of Lindisfarne, the leader of the missionaries responsible for bringing Christianity to most of northern England.

Whatever gifts he received from the rich he passed on at once to the poor.

The monk who preceded him on this mission failed completely and on returning to Iona laid the blame on the character of the English.

But Aidan spoke up in chapter.

“Brother,” he said, “I think you were too rigorous . . . . .and that you did not follow the Apostle’s rule of first giving them the milk of milder doctrine until little by little . . . . they were able to understand the more perfect mysteries and fulfil the greater commandments.”

The community, impressed by Aidan’s discretion, sent him instead.

For seventeen years he traveled continually, always on foot, and wherever he saw people he turned aside and spoke to them about the faith.

“He was,” writes St. Bede, “a bishop inspired with a passionate love of goodness, but at the same time a man of remarkable gentleness and moderation.”

 

661

Saint Finan, Irish monk of Iona.

Saint Aidan’s immediate successor as bishop of Lindisfarne, a staunch supporter of Celtic observances.

He baptized Penda, leader of the Middle English and Sigebert, king of the East Saxons.

At Lindisfarne he built a cathedral of wood thatched with sea grass.

 

CCC BLOG reprint:

LIVES OF THE SAINTS

Father Augustine Kalberer, OSB

Saints Aidan and Finan: Celtic Bishops of Lindisfarne

AUGUST 31

Page 313

CCC

 

MICHAEL HOWARD WHALING OF TEXAS ON VICTORIA’S JOHNSON STREET BRIDGE: ‘Please, keep the Blue Bridge’

Our first visit to your beautiful city presented us with many wonderful visual and cultural experiences.

One of the most fascinating was the Blue Bridge.

My wife and I were so pleased to find such an incredible piece of historic engineering, still functioning, still connected to its past.

You can only imagine our dismay when we read that your Council is considering replacing this marvellous structure in favour of something more “modern.”

The world visits Victoria, falls in love with it and keeps it forever in their hearts because of your historic beauty.

Your city offers a connection to a time past, a chance to walk slowly and take in the feeling of an era thought gone.

Your bridge is part of that feeling.

I would like to think that my 11-year-old grandson, who aspires to become an engineer, may one day journey to Victoria, and cross that same conveyance, just as his grandparents did on a fine summer’s day in August 2009.

No one in Victoria’s summer should ever be in that much of a hurry.

Please keep the Blue Bridge.


Michael Howard Whaling

Lakeway, Texas

 

CCC BLOG reprint:

Victoria Times Colonist

timescolonist.com

‘Keep Blue Bridge, says Texas visitor’

Sunday, August 30, 2009

Page C3

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DONALD T. HILMAN ON JOHNSON STREET BRIDGE ‘REPLACEMENT’: ‘The proposed project is more than twice the dollar amount of the arena project’

SAANICH RESIDENT SAYS ‘CAPITAL REGIONAL DISTRICT

AND OTHER MUNICIPALITIES MIGHT HAVE 

 SOMETHING TO SAY ABOUT SPENDING

THOSE BORROWED FEDERAL AND PROVINCIAL DOLLARS’ 

 

I am concerned with two issued taking place in the City of Victoria that affect me.

The City has applied for federal and provincial funding to finance one of the largest capital expenditures the region has seen in recent years.

It is prepared to borrow $63 million to replace the Johnson Street Bridge.

There is some scheduled time for public comment, but it comes after the City approves the borrowing of huge capital funds.

The horse will be well out of the gate by the time a public comment period begins.

The proposed project is more than twice the dollar amount of the arena project, which took two public referenda and much public discussion.

The Capital Regional District and other municipalities might have thing to say about spending those borrowed federal and provincial dollars.

These might suggest regional transit, highway and infrastructure improvements, homeless shelter projects, harbour infrastructure to attract tourists and many other deserving projects.

 

Donald T. Hilman

Saanich

 

CCC reprint:

Victoria Times Colonist, timescolonist.com

‘Blue Bridge a low priority’

Sunday, August 30, 2009

Page C3

CCC

 

RON MacISAAC: ‘Most popular provincial cost-saving step premier might take is to trim size of his cabinet’

GOOD ADVICE

FROM A THRIFTY SCOTS

CONSERVATIONIST LAWYER

 

Perhaps the most popular provincial cost-saving step the premier might take is to trim the size of his cabinet – say to the size of the cabinet that runs the United States.

One cannot help but think that having such a huge cabinet was just an excuse to pay his legislators more than the NDP’s legislators, which is exactly what happened.

The waste is not simply the bigger salaries of the huge number of unnecessary cabinet ministers, but their attached expenses of travel, staff and the like.

 

Ron MacIsaac

Victoria

 

CCC reprint: Victoria Times Colonist, timescolonist.com

‘Liberals should start by cutting cabinet’

Sunday, August 30, 2009

COMMENT

Page C3

 

CCC

SAINT MARGARET WARD + BLESSED JOHN ROCHE: AUGUST 30, 1588: Executed by Elizabeth I

AUGUST 30

1588

Saint Margaret Ward and Blessed John Roche, executed in London under Elizabeth I for helping Father William Watson escape from Bridewell prison.

Margaret was flogged and hung up by the wrists, the tips of her toes barely touching the ground.

At the trial, though threatened with more torture, she would not reveal the whereabouts of the priest.

Promised liberty if she would ask the Queen’s pardon and attend church, the saint replied that she was in no way sorry for having saved the priest; and as for going to the prescribed church, she was convinced it was unlawful; and she was ready, if she had them, to lay down many lives for the sake of God and her conscience.

On the same day three other people were executed for relieving priests – Blessed Edward Shelley, Blessed Richard Martin, and Venerable Richard Flower.

There was also Blessed Richard Leigh, who was martyred for his priesthood.

They sang on the way to Tyburn but were not allowed to address the crowd.

 

LIVES OF THE SAINTS

Father Augustine Kalberer, OSB

August 30: 1588

Saint Margaret Ward and Blessed John Roche

Page 312

 

CCC

ROSS CROCKFORD ON JOHNSON STREET BRIDGE DEMO: THE DECISION TO REPLACE VICTORIA’S ICONIC BLUE BRIDGE CAME WITHOUT PUBLIC INPUT

IT’S MADDENING TO THINK

WHAT BETTER THINGS WE COULD DO

WITH ALL THOSE MILLIONS

 

On April 24, Victorians awoke to shocking news.

“Victoria votes to replace bridge,” declared the front page of the Times Colonist, accompanied by a photo of the blue Johnson Street Bridge on the Inner Harbour.

Votes?  I scratched my head. There hadn’t been a public hearing much less a referendum.

And yet, Victoria’s City Council had decided to demolish a landmark and erect a new bridge without any blueprints, or a tenth of the money to pay for it.

In the weeks since, the scheme has accelerated with dizzying speed.

As I write this, the City has inked a $3.2-million deal with the MMM Group engineering firm to oversee construction, hired two full-time communications flacks, and readied the paperwork for a $63-million loan – all with no more input from citizens than a few letters to the editors of local papers.

“We don’t have months for public consultation,” said Mayor Dean Fortin, trying to sound as grim as a disaster-movie president.

 “We have months to build a bridge.”

If you live in Langford, you might be tempted to laugh, until you consider that similar backroom dealings have marked the interchange project on Spencer Road.

Transportation projects seem to follow the same disturbing pattern everywhere, and the bigger the decision, the smaller the chance you’ll have any influence upon it.

To be fair, if the City of Victoria has seemed frantic, some forces have been beyond its control.

Our newly elected City Councillors were just settling into their chairs in January, when the federal government suddenly announced a $4-billion intrastructure fund, giving two-thirds of the cash for projects that could be completed by March 2011.

Replacing the 1924-built blue bridge wasn’t even on the Council’s radar at the time: instead, the City’s list of “shovel-ready” projects called for $80-million to replace Crystal Pool.

But on April 2, everything changed.

City engineers delivered a PowerPoint presentation declaring that the blue bridge could “unlock and open” during an 8.5 earthquake, and its massive counterweights would collapse.

Bringing it up to seismic code would cost $25-million and make it last another 40 years, while a new bridge would cost $40-million and last 100 years, with another $20-million to reconfigure surrounding roads and bicycle trails.

Over the next three weeks, the Council swung toward a new bridge, chirping how it would “untangle”traffic and “open up” the skyline, and it ordered City staff to rush an application for $40-million in federal dough.

“It’s fundamentally our number one infrastructure priority,” Fortin said.

“There’s just no doubt about it.”

Sorry folks, but I have doubts aplenty.

I’m glad the mayor’s watching out for earthquakes – although if he really wants to worry about a bridge, maybe he should look at the one on Bay Street, which carries a water main, a gas pipeline, and phone and electricity cables.  My real concern, however, is that by rushing to erect a new Johnson Street Bridge, Fortin and the Council are putting the City at tremendous risk, without any public deliberation.

Knocking down the blue bridge will remove the only remaining landmark of the City’s industrial heritage that’s visible on the Inner Harbour.

As you probably know, the blue bridge is also one of the few surviving bascule drawbridges created by Joseph Strauss, designer of San Francisco’s Golden Gate, making it architecturally unique across the continent.

The City says that bringing the blue bridge up to code would require encasing it in plate steel, destroying its appearance, but I don’t buy it: other cities have managed to protect similar structures, like Toronto’s heritage-protected Cherry Street Bridge, without turning them into battleships.

Instead, with a new bridge, we’re almost guaranteed something bland.

Victoria has a sorry record of replacing historic structures (Campbell Building, Victoria Brewery) with ugly concrete slabs, and the same thing’s likely to happen again:  MMM’s portfolio is full of freeways, not distinctive bridges, and there will be no time for a design competition if construction has to start this November to meet the fed’s deadline.

Don’t be surprised if we get a bridge out of a catalogue.

The most maddening thing about the bridge project, however, is that it diverts resources from problems like homelessness, which this Council was elected to deal with in the first place.

The City is $43-million in debt already, so a new bridge means we can also forget about a new library or art gallery, both of which would generate more long-term employment and tourism than a one-shot construction job.

 

CCC reprint: Boulevard: The Magazine of Urban Living

September/October 2009

Ross Crockford

‘Public Citizen’

Pages 33 –  36

 

CCC