INVISIBLE CHARACTER, VOLUME ONE OF ‘MUTE AND MUTANT ALIENS,’ A THREE PART NOVEL, ‘When I was the proverbial young man…’ Excerpt from the new PATRICK JAMIESON paperback book: JAMIESON LAUNCH, WITH JURE READING : O’BEAN’S, TH. DEC. 4, 6:30 PM

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THE EDITOR OF ICN AND A RECENT CCC COUNCILLOR CANDIDATE,

PATRICK JAMIESON LAUNCHES HIS BOOK AT O’BEANS,

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4, 7:30 PM.  

HERE IS THE FIRST PAGE,

AS TYPESET BY LOUISE BEINHAUR OF WORD WORKS

LA ROSA TRANSCULTURAL ARTS PROPAGANDA 2008

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“I wish I had the time and courage to write a character novel.”  — comment on the CBC FM Radio by an anonymous Canadian Mystery writer.

When I was the proverbial young man, well, a much younger one, say twenty-five years ago, I willfully wore no facial hair.  These facial accoutrements only gained the possibilities of adorning my facade in my late thirties when I began to start to experiment with moustaches, beards, goatees even.

Not that facial hair was not in vogue.  If vogue can be a term applicable to my generation, before the flood.  I would claim that my generation was in fact anti-vogue.  At least I hope they were.  I like to think they were.  I believed they were then.

Certainly it was seen to be beneath us to chase fashion, or more accurately again, to be seen to be chasing fashion.  Of course, now they do — pursue the personally beautiful — perhaps for the same reason I am writing this.  In the search of something more secure.  In a radically shifting context, controlled clearly by forces well beyond your control, you try for this.

But back then we had a sense of security, or more accurately we did not have the need for one in the same way.  Either we did not know better, or we had each other; or both.  I like to think it was because we had more faith; that there was more  room for that.

Facial hair then was not strictly for the purpose of exhibiting personal beauty.  It only came to have that in time.  Then it was considered ugly unless exquisitely manicured.  We were making a personal political statement just as the ‘Beats’ had done during the decade before.  We owe so much to them; their road maps for the soul.

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LA ROSA TRANSCULTURAL ARTS PROPAGANDA 2008 

 

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JIM JAMIESON CELEBRATES 66 YEAR WEDDING ANNIVERSARY TO MARGARET HARRIS JAMIESON WITH HIS SON PATRICK JAMIESON

VISIT TO MARGARET’S GRAVE HIGHLIGHT OF SENTIMENTAL DAY

FOR CATHOLIC VETERAN WIDOWER

AND CCC COUNCILLOR CANDIDATE SON

margaret0002MARGARET HARRIS JAMIESON by ‘Goyo de la Rosa’ (Gregory Hartnell)

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These coloured drawings by ‘Goyo de la Rosa’ were reproduced in a back issue of

ISLAND CATHOLIC NEWS (ICN),

edited by Patrick Jamieson, son of the couple.

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Cover of Patrick Jamieson’s latest book, INVISIBLE CHARACTER, first volume of a three part novel,

MUTE AND MUTANT ALIENS, to be launched at O’Bean’s in December 

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SUZANNE CARROLL WRITES: DAVID SHEBIB ISSUED TICKETS FOR BEING IN CENTENNIAL SQUARE AFTER 7 A.M., NOT ALLOWED TO USE PUBLIC WASHROOMS; Former City Councillor Candidates continue vigil camp

SATURDAY NOVEMBER 29 MORNING + EVENING MESSAGES

FROM SALT SPRING ISLAND CANDIDATE FOR VICTORIA CITY COUNCIL

On Sat, Nov 29 at 10:00 am, M. Suzanne Carroll wrote to the Editor of the CCC BLOG:

UPDATE: Lone camper…

This morning at the sequoia tree David Shebib was approached by three uniformed police and one in plain clothes and two city by-law officers.  Two police vehicles were parked there, one a wagon for prisoners.  Shebib was issued a ticket simply for being there after 7 a. m. (the extension to 9 a. m. that was given to the campers arrested yesterday (Friday) was specifically and only for the encampment that was established 5 days ago by Woodruff, LeDrew, Dodds and Johnston.

Shebib was ticketed and required to remove his belongings immediately under threat of arrest.  His belongings were removed to a friend’s vehicle nearby.

Shebib is continuing his vigil and plans to camp again tonight. His cell number: 250 858 1311.

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Later, in the evening, M. Suzanne Carroll sent another UPDATE at 7:35 p. m.:

Today Mr. Shebib was refused entry to the public washrooms in the civic  square of the city of victoria, british columbia, canada, 2008.  which are guarded by federal officials twenty-four hours a day.  He was then ticketed by the victoria police department for pretending to peee or something…. since he didn’t actually pee….but the federal official watching him thought he peed? i may not have every single fact here straight but even so…. is this OK with everyone?  Hello?  Mr. Fortin?  Mesdames and Messieurs City Councillors nouveaux????

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KRISTEN WOODRUFF WRITES OF CENTENNIAL SQUARE CHRISTMAS TREE ARRESTS: ‘PAIN COMES AND GOES. LOVE IS FOREVER. LIFE OUTLIVES THE PRISONS AND THE GRAVE’

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…’Liberation’ by Fred H. Varley…

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Greetings from Kristen Woodruff:

 I am exhausted but happier than I have ever been.  The police took just about everything we had — tents, sleeping bags, food, winter jackets, blankets.  Leaving me and most of the other campers with only the clothes on our backs.  All this after we had quite willingly agreed with Ken Kelly, head of the Downtown Victoria Business Association, to leave Centennial Square by noon today (Friday, November 28th) so that he could host a Christmas tree lighting ceremony for the public.

The City insisted that this wasn’t good enough — and sent in a host of bylaw enforcement officers and police men to make sure we were out of there by 9 a.m.  On the authority of the City’s ‘Bylaw enforcement policy’ restricting tents to the hours between 7 p. m. and 7 a. m., the bylaw officers issued several $100 tickets for “constructing a temporary structure without a permit.’  They then arrested David Arthur Johnston and Tavis Dodds, on the charge of ‘continuing to disobey a bylaw.’  They didn’t seem to want to arrest me or anyone else who, like Johnston and Dodds, maintained that the officers had no authority to enforce the 7 p. m. to 7 a. m. policy.  They did give me a $100 ticket for the lit candle I had in front of me during the whole proceedings.

Just when we thought it was over, we heard a scuffle a few hundred feet away, under an awning where one of us stood watch over tents, tarps, sleeping bags, food, and other effects we had packed up earlier — before the the police even arrived.  The police were loading all the goods into a truck, and wouldn’t let us have anything back.  Scott, who had been watching the pile when the police came over, reported having told them, when asked ‘are these yours?’– ‘no, I don’t believe anything belongs to anyone, but I am taking care of these things.  And they are more mine than yours.’  Mine or yours or theirs, our stuff was, yet again, carted off to the abyss of the Police Department.  Never to be seen again, most likley.  People without a fixed address rarely get anything back from the police.

So we were back to nothing again.  No big deal, really.  For some reason we were all deliriously happy, maybe because we knew that the police and the City can’t take away anything real — they can steal our stuff, imprison our friends, neglect the rule of law.  No big deal.  They can’t take THAT away.  Someone from the media asked me if I was worried about my friends in jail.  I answered — ‘Well, when your friends are n the hands of people who show little respect for the law, it’s natural to worry.  But what are they going to do?  What’s the worst?  Torture my friends and make me watch, then kill they, then torture me, then kill me?  Well, fine.  Because even then you can’t take anything away.”  Pain come and goes.  Love is forever.  Life outlives the prisons and the grave.  Or as a young man who was released from police cells early this morning and came  by the camp for a rest said — ‘When you are free in here –‘ he gestured at his heart — ‘then you can be free, even in there [in jail].

The City of Victoria does not seem to be honoring the law in this case, to say the least — and this instance is just a sign of a broad pattern of lawlessness on the part of the City of Victoria.  And the victims of the City’s lawlessness are most often those least able to defend themselves.  

Our City government is not benevolent, even though there are some well-meaning individuals who work with the City in various capacities, and well-meaning citizens who would like to believe the City acts in the best interests of the people.  And the police are on the whole a gang of publicly-sanctioned bullies who intimidate the most vulnerable of our citizens into compliance.  That said, there are a few individual police officers who sincerely strive to protect the people, and I feel sorry for those commendable officers that they have to carry out the City’s illegal policies.

So, on the authority of a most likely illegal bylaw, the City held two people in jail today.  Happens every day to many homeless individuals, only it doesn’t usually make the evening news.  Every day this week people came into the camp in Centennial Square sharing stories of how the police stole all their stuff, beat them up, drove them out of City limits, or a combination of the three.  I had no idea it was a bad as it is.

Well — this afternoon Dodds and Johnston were released from custody, and given a speedy trial — unlike many people with No Fixed Address, they have a strong support net work, the back-up of two ninja-doddess lawyers who work for free (Irene and Cathy) and much public visibility.  The Justice System still work badly for them, but it works better for them than it does for most people living on the street.

Johnston and Dodds will appear in Court on Friday, December 5 for a trial which will begin the process of determining in the Court whether the City has any legal authority in enforcing a ban on tenting between 7 a. m. and 7 p. m., in light of Madame Justice Ross’s recent Supreme Court ruling.  This is really good news.

I was going to set up camp in Centennial Square again tonight.  I changed my mind.  When I returned to Centennial Square with David Johnston and Tavis Dodds around 5 p. m., our friends who had been waiting there while I was at the Courthouse were gone and so was their stuff.  The Square was full of people celebrating the opening of the Christmas shopping season, courtesy of the Downtown Victoria Business Association.  Christmas Carols played on loudspeakers.  The space under the tree that had served as our home for four days was empty.  No room in the inn and even the manger is off limits.  “It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas.”

We eventually ran into Jonathan Le Drew, who told us the bylaw officers had been by again, and had threatened to issue more tickets and make more arrests if Jonathan and two others didn’t leave the little patch of pavement where they and their few remaining belongings were huddled — quite out of the way of the official celebrations.

The four of us — Le Drew, Johnston, Dodds, and myself — hadn’t been there five minutes when a kind woman came by with a bag full of sandwiches for us — she had seen us on the news and was inspired to help.  Hot on her trail was a security guard working for the City, who threatened to call bylaw enforcement if we didn’t all move along.  Apparently, it is illegal to give gifts on public property in the City of Victoria.  Merry Christmas, hey?  But a little later another security guard came by, shook my hands, and gave me a tiny music box.  Yes, Merry Christmas.

With one security guard’s warning and another’s sweet gift, we moved along, each, eventually, in their own direction.  The community that had been building a home together was, yet again, divided by the City and its laws.  What the City and its laws don’t know is that no amount of apparent division can ever divide us.  We are a community bonded by love and by life and, no, you can’t take that away, even if you do everything in your power to drive us apart.  “We aren’t protestors,” Jonathan said, “we are lovers.”  We aren’t here to promote anthing,” G. said, “We promote living. Living.  Period.”  “They wanat to stamp out everything living,’ Scott said, “but you can’t stamp out anything living — just because you have a gun doesn’t mean you get to tell life what to do.”  Life, it seems, just keeps doing its beautiful life-thing, quite oblivious to this silly world of guns and money.

Well, speaking of guns, I hadn’t aken twenty steps before I ran into Constable Jamie Pierce, one of the policemen who was most keen to see us removed from Centennial Square.  I had just seen him at the Courthouse, where he told me “well, you had your little time,” waving his hands in the air and wigging his fingers — “and now it’s over.”  Then he added — “and you should tell your friends in Centennial Square that we are going there next to see them.”  Greeting me, as promised, in Centennial Square, he asked “So what are you doing here, Kristen?”  I said, “I’m celebrating the Christmas season with my neighbours, just like you, Jamie.”

Pierce and I parted company and I saw him going over to where a very tired Jonathan Le Drew sat on a rolled up blanket with a guitar given to hin in the day by a man who also had no fixed address, btu wanted to give his guitar “to the future Tent City.”  I caught up to Pierce in time to see him asking Jonathan to move along if he didn’t want his stuffs seized again.

I left Centennial Square shortly thereafter, but not before running into a man who gave me his tent and blanket.  He and his girlfriend were sleeping in a doorway, he said, and so they wouldn’t need their tent for awhile.

So I’m not staying in Centennial Square tonight (Friday, November 28th).  There is a time to strive and a time to surrender, a time to push and a time to yield.  I’m tired and tonight I won’t be sleeping in the public eye.  The City and Police Department can rest easy, even if no one else can.  

We will see what tomorrow brings.

Words can’t say “thank you” well enough to all the human angels who supported us in various ways in Centennial Square this week.  For all the gifts, in all their forms, and to all of you — thank you.  Your collective presence stuns me with its beauty.  This is what a community built on lov elooks like.  I had not idea.  It feels like we are on the verge of a miracle.  That we got this far is miracle enough for one night.  Thank you.

In peace and with much joy,

Kristen Woodruff

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L’ESPRIT D’EMILY CARR ET WOO A L’ACADEMIE DE SAINTE ANNE; SPIRIT OF EMILY CARR @ ST. ANN’S: Histoire Quebecoise Catholique de LA ROSA No. 6, de l’Hiver 1989-90; WOO: LA ROSA No. 17, 1991; St. Ann’s Academy has roots in Quebec, by Greg J. Edwards, Island Insight, BC Christian News, December 2008

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LA ROSA NO. 6 L’HIVER WINTER 1989 – 1990

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ENSEMBLE LAUDE PRESENTS: ‘REPASTS + RAINE-BOWES:’ A CONCERT OF MEDIEVAL + RENAISSANCE MUSIC: Free will offering benefit for St. Saviour’s Rainbow Kitchen, Nov. 30th, 2:00 pm

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TAVIS DODDS + DAVID ARTHUR JOHNSTON ARRESTED IN CENTENNIAL SQUARE: A Christmas Tragedy

KRISTEN WOODRUFF SAYS CHARGES WON’T STICK,

DENOUNCES CITY’S TOTALITARIAN TACTICS OF HARRASSMENT

By Gregory Hartnell

Two men were arrested in Centennial Square on Friday November 28 morning after refusing to move tents and other ‘chattels’ from under the Christmas Sequoia tree.  One was David Arthur Johnston, and the other was Tavis Dodds, a recent Victoria City Councillor Candidate in the Victoria Election.

The two local corporatist tv stations CHTV 6 (CanWest Global, Time Colonist, National Post) and A Channel 12 (CFAX, Globe and Mail) both ran stories on this tragi-comedy.  A Channel 12’s seemed to be more comprehensive, and contrasted starkly with the superficiality of the festivities that followed.

Kristen Woodruff was shown on both broadcasts.  She maintains that the charges will not stick as they have been thrown out twice in the courts recently, and that the constant arrests of homeless people is more usually found in totalitarian countries, and constitutes harrassment of the poor. 

Jonathan Le Drew, with a truly tortured expression on his haggard face, looking like a tragic character out of Picasso’s Blue Period, asks at the end of one of the broadcasts, ‘Victoria, where is your heart?’

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